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June 29, 2012
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Hey...

A lot of you have said how informative some of my journals have been particularly about the industry and how things work (or don't).

So let me know anything specific you'd like to know more about and I'll do some journals to cover as much of it as I can.

Post any suggestions below and I'll do what I can to answer them all.

Yours,

- Dave
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:iconsilverlute:
Silverlute Jun 30, 2012   Digital Artist
Sweet, I have some questions.

How those artists who don't have a degree in art stand compared to those who do have it? Is it relevant to have a degree, does it help, or it all depends of an artist's portfolio?

How much networking helps, what is good and what is bad networking?

What's the position of female artists in the industry (as in: does gender really matters)?
What to expect as a "landlubber" artist?
Where to start?
Why shouldn't someone work as an artist? (downsides of the job)

Thanks
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:icondeevelliott:
Nice gallery you have!

Okay, like most of the arts based industries, what matters most its what is in your portfolio.

If your work is amazing they'll ask if you went to college just to try and figure out how you got so good at it. Your portfolio will say more about you than your education ever can.

The downsides of the job I'm going to cover soon in a journal so hopefully I'll answer that quite soon.

Network definitely helps and you're in the perfect place already to start. Keep your page and journals updated as much as you can and then use Facebook and Twitter to drive people there.

As far as gender or race, it's been something that has never affected any decision I've made, but that's not to say it doesn't matter to some. Location used to be a huge thing but no longer. Now days if you're good and you can deliver on time that's what people are really interested in.

Yours,

- Dave
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:iconsilverlute:
Silverlute Jul 12, 2012   Digital Artist
Hey Dave, thanks a bunch :)

And thanks for the answer! It was helpful indeed. Some questions were on my mind for a while but when I asked some other artists about it before, they kinda liked to keep things "confidential". I'm looking forward to the journal entry since I'm quite interested in the subject, as you may have noticed.

All the best,
Militza
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:icondeevelliott:
Let me get San Diego Comicon behind me and I'll try to get the next journal up asap.

Take care!

- Dave
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:iconsilverlute:
Silverlute Jul 13, 2012   Digital Artist
Sure thing.
Good luck and have fun over there :)

You too!

Militza
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:iconmarshall-mc:
Hi Dave, I hope you don't mind the silly question, but what exactly does an Editor do, and how did you become one?
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:iconloona-cry:
Loona-Cry Jun 29, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
THE POWER OF CAPSLOCK COMPELS YOU! :lmao:

Well, I'd like to know a rough average of the amount of years most pros have been in the industry. :XD: I think it'd be interesting to see the average amount of years it taken for them to become as good as they are in their field. :)
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:icondeevelliott:
Hey Louise,

It's different for everyone. For whatever the reasons some artists appeal to more people or are better social networkers so get on the ladder faster and once on work hard to improve themselves. Most artists thrive and improve as they do more work and gain more experience.

But comics can also be a harsh mistress... You maybe on top today but might not be working tomorrow. A career as an artist is very difficult to plan for. Some like Jim Lee have been successful now for many years and is still one of the top artists, others not so. Some can reinvent themselves and their style others find jobs elsewhere, not always drawing.

So many artists today only use a pencil at conventions and do all their art on a tablet. These artists tend to be more adaptable as they find it easier to learn to color and paint on computer as well, expanding their talents and abilities.

I just don't know where to start to answer that question really. Do you count from when they first started drawing comics at 6 years old? ;-)

Blah... Pass.

:-)

- Dave
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:iconloona-cry:
Loona-Cry Jul 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
:wave:

Fair enough, it does make sense that some would have the advantage with networking (like any job, really). So I'm going to chalk up your 'answer' to it "depends on the individual in question now get lost and stop asking me hard questions". :lmao: More seriously, I count it from when they start putting out, for lack of better phrasing, material of a quality which can be connected to their published works even if they're yet to be published. (I hope that phrasing makes sense. :XD:) Then again, I don't suppose it makes it any easier to answer the question. Dx Cheers for trying at any rate. :)
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:icondeevelliott:
I think most artists need a couple of years of warming up and then around 5 years or more of working in the industry before they're ready to tackle one of those big jobs like Watchmen or Dark Knight. They need time to both grow as an artist but also find an audience for their work. It took Dave Gibbons over ten years to refine his style to the point he was really ready to do Watchmen.

The thing I like to see and encourage the most is where the artist has learnt enough about storytelling to make that leap to writing their own material. A few of the artists that do, end up producing their finest work by themselves. Look at Mike Mignola, Frank Miller, John Bryne and Steve Pugh.
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